GINOSAJI - THE HORRIBLY SLOW MURDERER WITH THE EXTREMELY INEFFICIENT WEAPON - FEATURE FILM

Created by Richard Gale

Epic horror comedy feature based on the viral short about the legendary Spoonkiller, with award-winning cast featuring Jeffrey Combs!

Latest Updates from Our Project:

Nothing Can Stop the Ginosaji
5 months ago – Tue, Jun 18, 2019 at 01:11:22 AM

This post is for backers only. Please visit Kickstarter.com and log in to read.

Going VIRAL... Again! Plus: We're #1!
11 months ago – Tue, Dec 18, 2018 at 12:03:21 AM

Hello Friends of the Spoon!

A couple pieces of exciting news to share:

First, undeniable evidence that the Ginosaji will never die...  In checking statistics on the short films, I was surprised to discover a massive tidal wave of new views in the past month -- turns out, a Korean subtitled version of Ginosaji vs. Ginosaji Pt.4 went viral in South Korea, resulting in more than a quarter million views in one day(!) and attracting a massive amount of new views for all the spoonkiller videos. 

Over 2 Million Views in November!

Thanks to this new viral activity, our videos received over 2.1 million views just in the past month! 

From YouTube Analytics:

Total views from all our videos worldwide (including foreign language versions) - Nov. 2018.  More than 285,000 views on Nov. 17.
Total views from all our videos worldwide (including foreign language versions) - Nov. 2018. More than 285,000 views on Nov. 17.

Another exciting statistic:

We're #1!

The IMDb's list of Horror Comedy short films is a complete list of every horror comedy short on the Internet Movie Database, which is practically every horror comedy short film ever made.

You can sort that list by Number of Votes, which is a measure of the public recognition of a film.

Out of 5,168 titles on the list, The Horribly Slow Murderer is ranked #1.

#3 is The Skeleton Dance by Walt Disney!

As befitting these massive statistics, huge things are cooking with the GINOSAJI movie.  Things are taking a long time to put together, but it is necessary in order to produce a vastly more epic movie!  

Concept Art

Night street attack concept art ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures LLC
Night street attack concept art ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures LLC
Night street attack concept art ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures LLC
Night street attack concept art ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures LLC
Night street attack concept art ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures LLC
Night street attack concept art ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures LLC


Details will be revealed as the next big steps are made. Thank you for your continued patience! There is much, much more to come.

Happy Holidays and Scary Christmas!

by Daniele Gatti
by Daniele Gatti

-Richard---o

How Much Bigger is It? + SCARY Ginosaji
about 1 year ago – Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 02:27:17 AM

Hello Friends of the Spoon! ---o

How Much Bigger Is It?

The feature length story is so very, very, very, very, VERY much bigger than the short film (and significantly bigger than our original feature concept), it is taking a lot longer to put together than we initially anticipated. But this is a very good thing -- the end result is going to be much more epic than anyone anticipates. Once I am able to announce details on the size of the production, you will understand what's taking so long. And you will be excited. Thank you for your patience!

I wanted to share with you a detail of the GINOSAJI project that is quite exciting and will set it apart from many horror comedies...

Ginosaji concept art by Richard Gale - ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures
Ginosaji concept art by Richard Gale - ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures

THE SCARE FACTOR

All horror comedies have a particular balance of scary/creepy stuff and humor -- and in The Horribly Slow Murderer short film (and many of our other shorts) there's a large proportion of comic stuff mixed with the horror. The Ginosaji himself is in many ways a kind of demented evil clown if you think about it. But there was always a thread of genuine creepiness woven through the short film, that will be stronger in the feature -- even though it sounds silly in concept, it is in fact also quite horrifying to consider actually being in Jack's shoes, pursued by an unstoppable being who incessantly attacks you, relentlessly hurts you with thousands upon thousands of small injuries. It's a real nightmare.

One Way to Describe the Genre of the Story

If the GINOSAJI story were an oreo, it would have a delicious creamy filling of horror and drama sandwiched between crackling comedy/thriller cookies. It would be a tremendously large and frightening oreo.

DARKNESS

In the short films, the look of the Ginosaji -- the way he sometimes appears in bright daylight, his skin shining bright white -- There won't be as much of that bright stuff. His face will be shrouded a bit more by the hood, and will generally appear more scary, creepy and mysterious.  Still inefficient as ever, just creepier.  Much of this can be achieved through lighting.

Ginosaji concept art by Richard Gale  ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures
Ginosaji concept art by Richard Gale ©2018 Ginosaji Pictures

The Freddy Krueger Effect - Keeping the Villain in the Dark

I saw A Nightmare on Elm Street (the original and first one) many years ago in the theatre, and it scared the hell out of me. I loved it. The way they showed Freddy Krueger -- he was mostly shrouded in darkness and shadow -- you did not get to see the full details of his face in almost any shot, and it wasn't until some later Elm Street sequels (ones not directed by Wes Craven) that you saw Freddie in brightly lit scenes, when suddenly, he just wasn't scary anymore (it also didn't help to give him lots of cheesy dialogue after killing people). The point is -- darkness, shadow, mystery is the way to go.  This lesson from horror films can be applied to horror-comedy as well -- the horror in horror-comedy still needs to be scary.

Same deal with Michael Myers in the original Halloween (another movie that inspired me years ago) -- he was usually shown partially hidden in darkness, or concealed by a hedge, or sheets on a clothesline -- which always made him appear creepier.

Richard Gale with Halloween director John Carpenter at the Director's Guild of America premiere of Masters of Horror
Richard Gale with Halloween director John Carpenter at the Director's Guild of America premiere of Masters of Horror

Ouch...

No specifics (no spoilers!), but suffice to say there could be times in the story when the Ginosaji experiences grievous bodily harm, and the effects might be shocking.  This would be a new dynamic which would add some never-before-seen creepiness.

Much more to come.  

Pleasant dreams.

--Richard---o

VIDEO GAME?!
over 1 year ago – Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 12:27:46 AM

Hello Friends of the Spoon!

This update focuses on an intriguing question...

Might there be a GINOSAJI VIDEO GAME?

We are exploring the possibility -- and our connection with the video game industry is growing, thanks to a cool development which involves some exciting news about members of our Ginosaji team...

Our award-winning music composer, Wlad Marhulets, has many talents -- when he's not making music, he's in the process of creating his first video game (not just the musical score, but the game itself!)-- with the help of some excellent artists and craftspeople. Entitled DARQ, it's a visually amazing psychological horror game set inside a lucid dream. The game is filled with mind-bending puzzles, frightening creatures and suspense -- and the normal laws of physics do not always apply!

Above: Screenshots from DARQ
Above: Screenshots from DARQ

Wlad has been generating a lot of buzz for the game, which showed previews of gameplay at the recent E3 show in Los Angeles, and has received positive attention from a lot of press including IGN and Gamespot.

I've been creatively involved with the DARQ project (providing input and feedback) since it began a couple years ago, and Ginosaji Executive Producer Chris Vick is also involved as a Producer on DARQ.

Wlad Marhulets and Chris Vick at E3 (the largest video game industry event) in Los Angeles
Wlad Marhulets and Chris Vick at E3 (the largest video game industry event) in Los Angeles

An Impressive Team

I'm quite inspired by what Wlad and his team have been able to accomplish. Some notable members of the DARQ team include sound designer Bjørn Jacobsen, who did sound design on EVE Online and is currently working on Cyberpunk 2077, one of the most eagerly anticipated games of the year.  DARQ's music mixer Adam Schmidt has worked on a number of great film projects including Inception, The Dark Knight Rises, and Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, and on the games Detroit: Become Human and Ratchet and Clank, among others.

DARQ is scheduled to be released on Steam for PC towards the end of this year, and will likely be ported to other game platforms as well.

The screenshots above are just a taste.  You should check out the game in action in the exciting E3 teaser trailer for DARQ

There's more info at the official website

A First Person Spooner?!

I've been learning a lot about the gaming industry and the process of producing a game, thanks to my involvement on DARQ -- and I'm seriously thinking about creating a Ginosaji-related video game in the future.  We will explore different possibilities, but the game would need to have the spirit of the films: wild, fun, and action packed horror comedy.  We plan to connect with a number of companies to explore these possibilities further down the road. 

So much more to come... stay spoooned.

-Richard---o

The Steadicam + Paul in Training
over 1 year ago – Sat, May 26, 2018 at 11:11:14 PM

Hello Friends of the Spoon!

Thought I'd give you some background on my experience with one of my favorite moviemaking tools...

The Steadicam

Ever since I was a teenager, I've had a serious fascination for the Steadicam -- the camera stabilizer invented by Garrett Brown (for which he won an Academy Award -- here's the clip from the 1978 Oscars).  Something about the magical smoothness, and the ability of the camera to glide almost anywhere was something I loved and wanted to do in my own work.  

Above: The third film Garrett Brown used his invention on was Rocky -- for the training sequence, the shot of Rocky running up the museum steps, and the big fight. That's Garrett with an early version of the Steadicam, with Sylvester Stallone.
Above: The third film Garrett Brown used his invention on was Rocky -- for the training sequence, the shot of Rocky running up the museum steps, and the big fight. That's Garrett with an early version of the Steadicam, with Sylvester Stallone.
Above: Steadicam inventor Garrett Brown (right) with Stanley Kubrick (left) during the filming of The Shining, one of my all-time favorites. It was Garrett chasing Danny and Jack Torrance through the Overlook Hotel and the hedge maze.
Above: Steadicam inventor Garrett Brown (right) with Stanley Kubrick (left) during the filming of The Shining, one of my all-time favorites. It was Garrett chasing Danny and Jack Torrance through the Overlook Hotel and the hedge maze.

Meeting Garrett Brown

I had the great fortune to meet Garrett Brown at an industry event some years ago -- he let me try out a few different Steadicam models, including what was at that time the smallest camera ever to fly on a steadicam (below)

Richard Gale and Steadicam inventor Garrett Brown
Richard Gale and Steadicam inventor Garrett Brown
Richard Gale and Garrett Brown
Richard Gale and Garrett Brown

I also wore a larger Steadicam rig, and Garrett was having me run in place to demonstrate his invention to some other people at the event.  At one point, I took my hands off the post and allowed the camera to float freely as I ran in place -- something which requires a good deal of practice.  Garrett smiled and said, "oh, you're dangerous!"  For a cinema / techie geek like me, I was in Heaven.

Some years later, I took the official Steadicam training workshop taught by Tiffen / Steadicam in Burbank, and learned to fly larger rigs.

Richard Gale operating a Steadicam Zephyr
Richard Gale operating a Steadicam Zephyr

Steadicam on the short film

I used a Steadicam Merlin for many shots of The Horribly Slow Murderer short film, and it really added to the excitement to have those fast tracking shots for the chase scenes.

Richard Gale shooting the Horribly Slow Murderer short film
Richard Gale shooting the Horribly Slow Murderer short film
Filming the library chase for the Horribly Slow Murderer short film with the Steadicam
Filming the library chase for the Horribly Slow Murderer short film with the Steadicam

Preparing for the Feature Film

For the GINOSAJI feature, I plan to use a steadicam to fly the RED Epic camera, to capture a number of cool shots.  One of the advantages of the Steadicam is that sometimes you can save time by not having to lay down dolly tracks, which can be very limiting depending on the location.  (However you do have to take the time to clear the path of any trip hazards! Also, the steadicam operator usually has an assistant walk with them as they operate to make sure they don't run into anything.)

Richard Gale flying a RED Epic camera on the Steadicam Solo
Richard Gale flying a RED Epic camera on the Steadicam Solo

It's All About Quality

If there's a single primary objective for this project, it's quality.  It has to be great quality, and the Steadicam is one of the tools that will help us achieve shots that look like a million.  

Paul in Training

Paul Clemens (Jack Cucchiaio) has been working to get into shape for what will be a physically difficult shoot, due to so much running and action.  In addition to having a membership at a local gym, Paul and I meet up regularly to go for extended hikes / jogging. 

Above: Paul Clemens after a two hour brisk hike in LaCienega Park, across the street from the Motion Picture Academy Library.
Above: Paul Clemens after a two hour brisk hike in LaCienega Park, across the street from the Motion Picture Academy Library.

More to come!  Stay Spooned!

-Richard---o